Another recent taxonomic change

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TheRealAntMan
Posts: 568
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2017 5:59 pm
Location: Chicago, Illinois

Another recent taxonomic change

Post: # 48953Post TheRealAntMan
Fri Aug 31, 2018 6:51 am

I know I already wrote about this but no one seemed to have read so I'm writing about it again.As many of you might know Formica Fusca is NOT found in North America. The once believed Formica Fusca of North America is actually not related to the Formica Fusca in other parts of the world. A friend (on Formiculture) recently told me that myrmecologists did a DNA test to see if the "Formica Fusca" here is related to those in different parts of the world and turns out it's not. So from here on out we shall refer to Formica Fusca as Formica Subaenescens (I know its a little hard to say) here in North America. Thank you for reading this and I know a lot of will still refer to Formica Fusca instead but try not too.
He also wrote a thread on it too: http://www.formiculture.com/topic/9788-formica-fusca-is-not-in-north-america/#entry100808.
An ants' strength can be rivaled by few animals compared to relative body size.

MorbidBugg
Posts: 285
Joined: Wed Jul 04, 2018 10:11 pm
Location: Orangeville

Re: Another recent taxonomic change

Post: # 49339Post MorbidBugg
Mon Sep 03, 2018 9:15 pm

Now with that said is it plausible that a queen could be transported accidentally via plant. And because it is similar in many ways could it not find a way to establish itself and hide amongst the natives? Making it impossible to tell if any fusca did manage to make a foothold specifically along port trade routes?
Ants are life's most successful invaders. Understand and respect that power.

JoeHostile1
Posts: 175
Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:51 am
Location: Canada
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Re: Another recent taxonomic change

Post: # 50548Post JoeHostile1
Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:57 am

Any idea how to pronounce that properly?
Keeping:
Tetramorium immigrans * Lasius Neoniger * Lasius Claviger * Messor Aciculatus * Myrmica Rubra * Camponotus Novaeboracensis * Camponotus Turkastanus * Pheidole Pallidula

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MorbidBugg
Posts: 285
Joined: Wed Jul 04, 2018 10:11 pm
Location: Orangeville

Re: Another recent taxonomic change

Post: # 50550Post MorbidBugg
Mon Sep 17, 2018 11:09 am

JoeHostile1 wrote:
Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:57 am
Any idea how to pronounce that properly?
If I'm not mistaken to pronounce it would be sub ay(like day) Ness senz (more z sound then s)
Ants are life's most successful invaders. Understand and respect that power.

LearningAntz
Posts: 55
Joined: Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:54 am
Location: Sherwood Park, Alberta

Re: Another recent taxonomic change

Post: # 50594Post LearningAntz
Tue Sep 18, 2018 7:08 am

TheRealAntMan wrote:
Fri Aug 31, 2018 6:51 am
I know I already wrote about this but no one seemed to have read so I'm writing about it again.As many of you might know Formica Fusca is NOT found in North America. The once believed Formica Fusca of North America is actually not related to the Formica Fusca in other parts of the world. A friend (on Formiculture) recently told me that myrmecologists did a DNA test to see if the "Formica Fusca" here is related to those in different parts of the world and turns out it's not. So from here on out we shall refer to Formica Fusca as Formica Subaenescens (I know its a little hard to say) here in North America. Thank you for reading this and I know a lot of will still refer to Formica Fusca instead but try not too.
He also wrote a thread on it too: http://www.formiculture.com/topic/9788-formica-fusca-is-not-in-north-america/#entry100808.
This change has been in place for quite a while now.

DontSquishTheAnt
Posts: 34
Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2018 1:00 pm
Location: Connecticut

Re: Another recent taxonomic change

Post: # 50608Post DontSquishTheAnt
Tue Sep 18, 2018 9:19 am

The pronunciation is For-MEE-kuh sub-AI (as in aisle) -neskence (no Z sound at the end, it should sound more like the end of sixpence).

Latin pronunciation guide for the Roman system:
https://forum.AntsCanada.com/viewtopic.php?f=37&t=11482
First year and already enjoying it!

Founding:
1 Solenopsis molesta with ~10 nanitics
3 Crematogaster sp. Waiting on the nanitics for species level identification. Suspected C. cerasi

Genesis 1:24

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