Lasius ants that sting

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AntsDakota
Posts: 1120
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2018 4:22 pm
Location: South Dakota

Lasius ants that sting

Post: # 49914Post AntsDakota
Sun Sep 09, 2018 5:02 pm

I heard from Hunter360 that Lasius niger have stingers. I noticed that Lasius claviger also have stingers. I could see them sticking them out of their abdomens. I'm assuming a lot of common Lasius species have stingers, which is interesting because I've never heard of a species from the subfamily Formicinae that stings. Most spray formic acid. The stinging genera and species are usually from the subfamily Myrmicinae, including Myrmica, Solenopsis, Tetramorium, ect.
"God made every kind of wild beasts and every kind of livestock and every kind of creeping things;" (including ants) "and God saw that it was good." Genesis 1:25

Hunter36o
Posts: 217
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2018 9:57 am
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Re: Lasius ants that sting

Post: # 49945Post Hunter36o
Mon Sep 10, 2018 5:08 am

Hey!! That's Hunter36o to you haha. O is a lower case letter :p (sorry it's not a random callsign it's was actually made like 5 years ago. So if u see that anywhere. It's me :D )

And yes I took me completely off guard to see. Now with out a micro lens or scope to get a good look we cannot confirm exactly, but though a lot of image and video watching (spent 3 hour straight >.<) It does not look like a spay pose from the abdomen because they do not touch the surface they spray where as these Niger's full on pressed against the victim.
Personally I am really excited to discover more.
Officially caring for 4 Lasius colonies :D :D :D

Founding stage:
11x Lasius Niger
1x Myrmica Rubra
1x Myrmica ??

AntsDakota
Posts: 1120
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2018 4:22 pm
Location: South Dakota

Re: Lasius ants that sting

Post: # 50040Post AntsDakota
Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:15 pm

Hunter36o wrote:
Mon Sep 10, 2018 5:08 am
Hey!! That's Hunter36o to you haha. O is a lower case letter :p (sorry it's not a random callsign it's was actually made like 5 years ago. So if u see that anywhere. It's me :D )

And yes I took me completely off guard to see. Now with out a micro lens or scope to get a good look we cannot confirm exactly, but though a lot of image and video watching (spent 3 hour straight >.<) It does not look like a spay pose from the abdomen because they do not touch the surface they spray where as these Niger's full on pressed against the victim.
Personally I am really excited to discover more.
Yeah. I always wondered how Lasius queens could kill each other so fast. But a stinger makes since.
"God made every kind of wild beasts and every kind of livestock and every kind of creeping things;" (including ants) "and God saw that it was good." Genesis 1:25

Hunter36o
Posts: 217
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2018 9:57 am
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Re: Lasius ants that sting

Post: # 50099Post Hunter36o
Wed Sep 12, 2018 3:43 am

It also backs up a their natural aggressive behaviour, I also see that about Lasius but at first I did not fully get it because I could not understand how a weaponless/ defenceless ant would even want to be aggressive as it would prove dangerous, however a stinger back this up and gives them cause to push forward then to submit.

Honestly the best we can do for now is either look at these girls under a microscope or lens or if that is not possible, send some workers and or a dead queen to someone who can take a closer look to see exactly what is going on.

I am in love with my friends question tho. He is not a big ant lover but he is a thinker and loves to ask the right questions. This one coming up after I explained why it is bad to import ants. He wonders if with the introduction of stronger and more aggressive ants could the Lasius species instead of backing down or allowing them to be pushed back from being the most common European species they could have "evolved to be come more adapt at defending them selves?"
Although rare evolution has been known to go into hyperdrive when a new generation is born if the species is in particular trouble that nature refuses to let them go into alone. Thus allowing newer gens of Lasius to possess a stinger.

Or another rare but possible reason behind this is somewhere down the lines Lasius mated with another species but that would involve a bigger understanding of ant DNA to be able to tell if this is probable. All round this proves we know a lot less then we think about any specific species of ant. Opening up the door to be able to take part in the discovery of species behaviour or maybe even go as far as to make a scientific discovery (like Lasius having stingers, and no I did not discover this trait only that I have been put in the situation where I can confidently back this up)

So remember when keeping your ants. We do not know all there is to know so do not be afraid to experiment with so long as it is not a dangours one that could result in the end of your colony.

Also some little things you may want to investigate for your self is that I have personally read that Lasius Niger's are the European architects of the ant world. Some colonies have been known to build bridges!! So test this also. :D
Officially caring for 4 Lasius colonies :D :D :D

Founding stage:
11x Lasius Niger
1x Myrmica Rubra
1x Myrmica ??

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