Product Endorsement: Omni Nest Vertical

Discussion and information relating to the AntsCanada Omni Nest Series.

Moderator: ooper01

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AntGuy
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:58 pm
Location: United States

Product Endorsement: Omni Nest Vertical

Post: # 17631Post AntGuy
Mon Feb 27, 2017 9:51 pm

Solenopsis spp. 24 days after moving in to my brand new Omni Nest Vertical: Large.
Image

All of the brood pictured has developed since move-in. The brood pile is over 1,000 larva and pupa. Very happy ants.

Colony sparingly occupies 8 of the 55 chambers of the nest; probably 2,500 ants. By my estimate, the population could expand to 30,000-40,000 before crowding set in.

Modifications: Solenopsis spp. tends to escape through cracks on the bottom of the outworld, as well as cracks in the top of the vertical nest. I simply sealed all gaps with a thin line of low-temperature hot glue and the problem was resolved completely. They are very small ants, 1/8 to 1/4" in length, so this was an expected issue.

I would definitely recommend this nest setup, but if keeping a smaller species, be prepared to do some guess and check to seal off breeches.


The entire setup. The table in this picture has a thick band of baby powder, which was later cleaned off and replaced with fluon/insect-a-slip to add a second-layer containment barrier for escapees. Again, after a little hot glue to the top of the nest the issue was completely remedied.
Image

idahoantgirl
Posts: 772
Joined: Sat Sep 12, 2015 11:52 am
Location: Idaho, USA

Re: Product Endorsement: Omni Nest Vertical

Post: # 17641Post idahoantgirl
Tue Feb 28, 2017 10:55 am

AntGuy wrote:
Mon Feb 27, 2017 9:51 pm
Solenopsis spp. 24 days after moving in to my brand new Omni Nest Vertical: Large.
Image

All of the brood pictured has developed since move-in. The brood pile is over 1,000 larva and pupa. Very happy ants.

Colony sparingly occupies 8 of the 55 chambers of the nest; probably 2,500 ants. By my estimate, the population could expand to 30,000-40,000 before crowding set in.

Modifications: Solenopsis spp. tends to escape through cracks on the bottom of the outworld, as well as cracks in the top of the vertical nest. I simply sealed all gaps with a thin line of low-temperature hot glue and the problem was resolved completely. They are very small ants, 1/8 to 1/4" in length, so this was an expected issue.

I would definitely recommend this nest setup, but if keeping a smaller species, be prepared to do some guess and check to seal off breeches.


The entire setup. The table in this picture has a thick band of baby powder, which was later cleaned off and replaced with fluon/insect-a-slip to add a second-layer containment barrier for escapees. Again, after a little hot glue to the top of the nest the issue was completely remedied.
Image
just a question... does baby powder or fluon work on a horizontal surface? I can see how it would make them slip in a vertical surface but I don't see how it will help horizontally.
Proverbs 6:6-11

Go to the ant, you sluggard;
consider its ways and be wise!
It has no commander,
no overseer or ruler,
yet it stores its provisions in summer
and gathers its food at harvest.

Fulkol
Posts: 93
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:42 pm
Location: Budapest

Re: Product Endorsement: Omni Nest Vertical

Post: # 17645Post Fulkol
Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:25 am

idahoantgirl wrote:
Tue Feb 28, 2017 10:55 am
AntGuy wrote:
Mon Feb 27, 2017 9:51 pm
Solenopsis spp. 24 days after moving in to my brand new Omni Nest Vertical: Large.
Image

All of the brood pictured has developed since move-in. The brood pile is over 1,000 larva and pupa. Very happy ants.

Colony sparingly occupies 8 of the 55 chambers of the nest; probably 2,500 ants. By my estimate, the population could expand to 30,000-40,000 before crowding set in.

Modifications: Solenopsis spp. tends to escape through cracks on the bottom of the outworld, as well as cracks in the top of the vertical nest. I simply sealed all gaps with a thin line of low-temperature hot glue and the problem was resolved completely. They are very small ants, 1/8 to 1/4" in length, so this was an expected issue.

I would definitely recommend this nest setup, but if keeping a smaller species, be prepared to do some guess and check to seal off breeches.


The entire setup. The table in this picture has a thick band of baby powder, which was later cleaned off and replaced with fluon/insect-a-slip to add a second-layer containment barrier for escapees. Again, after a little hot glue to the top of the nest the issue was completely remedied.
Image
just a question... does baby powder or fluon work on a horizontal surface? I can see how it would make them slip in a vertical surface but I don't see how it will help horizontally.
exactly what I wanted to ask

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ooper01
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Re: Product Endorsement: Omni Nest Vertical

Post: # 17656Post ooper01
Tue Feb 28, 2017 7:11 pm

Nice setup! And thanks for the endorsement :)
~ ooper

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AntGuy
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:58 pm
Location: United States

Re: Product Endorsement: Omni Nest Vertical

Post: # 17685Post AntGuy
Wed Mar 01, 2017 11:30 am

ooper01 - I am indeed impressed. Once all breeches are sealed, the setup is very fire-and-forget.

I cannot stress enough just how massive your colony can get in this setup and still live comfortably. To people worrying about the size of housing, just don't. It's enough!

To other folks wondering about fluon on flat surfaces (the baby powder was replaced with fluon) - ants CAN walk across it, but it's difficult for them, and they will avoid it if given a choice. I kept some honey water in a cup in the center of the table to draw in escapees; in spite of this, the big draw for escaped ants seemed to be to want to get back into the nest. I never saw any ants walk across the barrier that did escape during my troubleshooting process; those that did escape were close by or hiding under the light barrier I created for the omni nest. This may be due to the fact that the colonies I have are very well fed, or I was simply lucky, or it's just the nature of the Solenopsis genus or particular species I'm keeping. Once they are out of the nest, the behavior of foraging workers is very timid.

FYI, the WORST species to keep in captivity is the western thatching ant, Formica Obscuripes. They are incredible climbers, move as fast as cockroaches when the temperature is high, and seem to scale all barriers. You have been warned.

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