Feeding new queens?

Questions from those who are just starting or considering getting into the ant keeping hobby. If you’re intimidated or confused by the in-depth posts of the other sections of this forum, feel free to post here, and we'll start from square one!

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Kalous
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jun 15, 2017 8:01 am
Location: Canada

Feeding new queens?

Post: # 25662Post Kalous
Wed Jul 19, 2017 8:19 pm

First, I'm very new at this and am perhaps a bit overly "motherly" and am just being a tard, but I feel the need to try and feed my my Queens even though they don't yet have their first workers mainly because they live in a semi-cool environment and I worry they are developing slower. Would it be alright if I were to put a newly deceased woodlouse or some honey in their tubes?

idahoantgirl
Posts: 829
Joined: Sat Sep 12, 2015 11:52 am
Location: Idaho, USA

Re: Feeding new queens?

Post: # 25673Post idahoantgirl
Wed Jul 19, 2017 9:32 pm

Kalous wrote:
Wed Jul 19, 2017 8:19 pm
First, I'm very new at this and am perhaps a bit overly "motherly" and am just being a tard, but I feel the need to try and feed my my Queens even though they don't yet have their first workers mainly because they live in a semi-cool environment and I worry they are developing slower. Would it be alright if I were to put a newly deceased woodlouse or some honey in their tubes?
I wouldn't They are created to be able to survive off of their own food stores, and trying to feed her will only stress her out and slow her development further.
Proverbs 6:6-11

Go to the ant, you sluggard;
consider its ways and be wise!
It has no commander,
no overseer or ruler,
yet it stores its provisions in summer
and gathers its food at harvest.

Keeper of Tetramorium Sp. E, Lasius Neoniger

dinoman9877
Posts: 70
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 7:03 pm
Location: Covington, Kentucky

Re: Feeding new queens?

Post: # 26994Post dinoman9877
Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:16 am

There are two types of queens: caudal and semi-caudal. Caudal queens are fed as much protein and carbs as they can be fed and sent off to mate. They can be recognized by their large thoraxes. After mating, they find a spot to nest, dig a hole, and never come to the surface again unless moving nests.

Semi-caudal are not given all that they need to start life on their own. Most social parasites are semi-caudal. These queens leave their nests to hunt for food and water, making herself and her brood vulnerable. One mistake and the colony dies. When the first workers leave the nest, they too become shut ins. They usually just look like larger workers with thicker abdomens from the wing muscles.

For caudal queens, it is important to leave them alone. They need peace and quiet to be healthy and raise their brood. The first workers eclosing is when you need to worry about feeding. Hibernation will be coming up (unless you're in an area with constant temperature. Most tropical and some sub-tropical ants are active year round) and the queen and brood need to be ready for it. Three months without eating won't be easy for her after stress caused by the founding, but they been doing it for millions of years.

idahoantgirl
Posts: 829
Joined: Sat Sep 12, 2015 11:52 am
Location: Idaho, USA

Re: Feeding new queens?

Post: # 27028Post idahoantgirl
Thu Jul 27, 2017 11:04 am

dinoman9877 wrote:
Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:16 am
There are two types of queens: caudal and semi-caudal. Caudal queens are fed as much protein and carbs as they can be fed and sent off to mate. They can be recognized by their large thoraxes. After mating, they find a spot to nest, dig a hole, and never come to the surface again unless moving nests.

Semi-caudal are not given all that they need to start life on their own. Most social parasites are semi-caudal. These queens leave their nests to hunt for food and water, making herself and her brood vulnerable. One mistake and the colony dies. When the first workers leave the nest, they too become shut ins. They usually just look like larger workers with thicker abdomens from the wing muscles.

For caudal queens, it is important to leave them alone. They need peace and quiet to be healthy and raise their brood. The first workers eclosing is when you need to worry about feeding. Hibernation will be coming up (unless you're in an area with constant temperature. Most tropical and some sub-tropical ants are active year round) and the queen and brood need to be ready for it. Three months without eating won't be easy for her after stress caused by the founding, but they been doing it for millions of years.
It's not caudal. It's claustral.
Proverbs 6:6-11

Go to the ant, you sluggard;
consider its ways and be wise!
It has no commander,
no overseer or ruler,
yet it stores its provisions in summer
and gathers its food at harvest.

Keeper of Tetramorium Sp. E, Lasius Neoniger

dinoman9877
Posts: 70
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 7:03 pm
Location: Covington, Kentucky

Re: Feeding new queens?

Post: # 27030Post dinoman9877
Thu Jul 27, 2017 11:42 am

I haven't heard the term in forever, alright? Lol

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